Tiff

22 Mar 2016 153 views
 
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photoblog image UPPER SLAUGHTER

UPPER SLAUGHTER

 

 

Upper Slaughter is a village in the English county of Gloucestershire located in the Cotswold district located 4 miles south west of the town of Stow-on-the-Wold. Nearby places include Lower Slaughter, Bourton-on-the-Water and Daylesford.

The village is built on both banks of the River Eye. The Anglican parish church is dedicated to St. Peter.

Upper Slaughter was identified by author Arthur Mee as one of 32 Thankful Villages, although more recent work suggests a total of 52. This term referred to the small number of villages in England and Wales which had lost no men in World War I, and was popularised by Mee in the 1930s. In Enchanted Land (1936), the introductory volume to "The King's England" series of guides, he wrote "that a Thankful Village was one which had lost no men in the Great War because all those who left to serve came home again." Although the village was subject to an air raid, it also lost no men in World War II, an honour held by only 14 villages, collectively known as the Doubly Thankful Villages

UPPER SLAUGHTER

 

 

Upper Slaughter is a village in the English county of Gloucestershire located in the Cotswold district located 4 miles south west of the town of Stow-on-the-Wold. Nearby places include Lower Slaughter, Bourton-on-the-Water and Daylesford.

The village is built on both banks of the River Eye. The Anglican parish church is dedicated to St. Peter.

Upper Slaughter was identified by author Arthur Mee as one of 32 Thankful Villages, although more recent work suggests a total of 52. This term referred to the small number of villages in England and Wales which had lost no men in World War I, and was popularised by Mee in the 1930s. In Enchanted Land (1936), the introductory volume to "The King's England" series of guides, he wrote "that a Thankful Village was one which had lost no men in the Great War because all those who left to serve came home again." Although the village was subject to an air raid, it also lost no men in World War II, an honour held by only 14 villages, collectively known as the Doubly Thankful Villages

comments (16)

  • Penny
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Mar 2016, 00:32
Very interesting information, Chris, and especially amazing considering the name of the village!
I have two collections of Arthur Mee's Children's Encyclopaediae.
Chris: I couldn't really get over the oddity of the village name and the fate of its menfolk. Maybe all the slaughtering happened decades before..
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 22 Mar 2016, 00:42
A very fine composition, Sire!
Chris: I am obliged to you. I took Pauline (Carreksmum) for a drive the other day and we happened upon this place by chance
  • Martine
  • France
  • 22 Mar 2016, 03:48
J'aime beaucoup la composition avec les jonquilles en premier plan.
Chris: Thank you kindly Martine. There is very little natural greenery up on the Cotswold hills as yet, but the daffodils more than made up for this
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 22 Mar 2016, 06:03
And we have a "doubly thankful" village on our doorstep,as you know, Chris
Chris: We do indeed Lisl. I must find out where the others are
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 22 Mar 2016, 07:29
a wonderful spring image - I would like to visit this thankful village one day!
Chris: And I would be happy to take you there Philine
I didn't know about the thankful villages.

Nice snap
Chris: I am obliged 2 U
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Mar 2016, 08:35
I've not heard of the Thankful Villages before and certainly not the Doubly Thankful Villages; that;s good to hear but so sad to think of thoise other lcoations were many men were lost. Its been many years since I've been to the Slaughters; your view makes me want to go again - soon!
Chris: After you have relinquished the seat of power the Cotswolds can be a place for you to enjoy at your leisure
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 22 Mar 2016, 09:26
Chris: Much obliged to you Philine
The term is wonderful! It would be interesting to know the origin of the town name. Perhaps Slaughter came from a place where animals were slaughtered or from an ancient battle. The photo is gorgeous!!!
Chris: I shall have to check this out but I suspect Slaughter might mean something completely different
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Mar 2016, 11:47
Up in our neck of the woods. Very fine image Chris.
Chris: Thank you Mike. It was taken last week on a cloudless day
How very English, Chris, a lovely shot. I had never heard of 'the thankful villages' before. Thanks.
Chris: A pleasure Frank
  • Pauline
  • United Kingdom
  • 22 Mar 2016, 11:54
Happy memories, Tiff.
Chris: Very much so Pauline
A lovely shot Chris. Back when we had a break at Bourton a few years ago we done both the Slaughters and thought how pretty they both are.
Chris: They are both a delight Brian, especially in spring before the coachloads of tourists arrive
very peaceful, Springy shot.
Chris: An area in the Cotswolds Alan, not too far distant from Chad's abode
Doubly thankful it deserved to be!
Chris: Yes it does Tom: thank you
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 23 Mar 2016, 07:11
Rather prosaically "Slaughter" comes from Old English "slohtre" meaning "the muddy place"

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