Tiff

28 Jun 2015 140 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image SUMMER IN SUSSEX

SUMMER IN SUSSEX

The Petworth lands in Sussex, where we went yesterday, first came into the Percy family as a royal gift from Adeliza of Louvain, the widow of King Henry I, to her brother Joscelin of Louvain. He later married into the Percy family and adopted the surname; his descendents became the Earls of Northumberland, the most powerful in northern England.

The Percy family, whose primary seat was at Alnwick Castle near Scotland, intended for Petworth to be for occasional use. However, in the late 16th century, Queen Elizabeth I grew suspicious of the Percy's allegiance to Mary, Queen of Scots, and confined them to Petworth.

In 1670, Josceline Percy, 11th Earl of Northumberland died without a male heir, leaving his considerable fortune and estates of Petworth House, Alnwick Castle, Syon House and Northumberland House to his 2-year-old daughter, Elizabeth. In 1682, already twice widowed at age 16, Elizabeth Percy married Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset. The pair became one of the wealthiest couples in England.

The current site was previously occupied by a fortified manor house founded by Henry de Percy, the 13th-century chapel and undercroft of which still survive. For the past 250 years the house and the estate have been in the hands of the prominent Wyndham family.

The house and deer park were handed over to the nation in 1947 and are now managed by the National Trust under the name Petworth House & Park.

The Leconfield Estates continue to own much of Petworth and the surrounding area. The contents of the house, in particular the paintings and sculptures, are now the property of the National Trust having been taken in lieu of accumulated death duties.

Lord Egremont and his family live in the south wing, allowing much of the remainder to be open to the public. Lady Egremont has restored the gardens.

Today's building houses an important collection of paintings and sculptures, including 19 oil paintings by J. M. W. Turner (some owned by the family, some by Tate Britain), who was a regular visitor to Petworth, paintings by Van Dyck, carvings by Grinling Gibbons and Ben Harms, classical and neoclassical sculptures (including ones by John Flaxman and John Edward Carew), and wall and ceiling paintings by Louis Laguerre. There is also a terrestrial globe by Emery Molyneux, believed to be the only one in the world in its original 1592 state

SUMMER IN SUSSEX

The Petworth lands in Sussex, where we went yesterday, first came into the Percy family as a royal gift from Adeliza of Louvain, the widow of King Henry I, to her brother Joscelin of Louvain. He later married into the Percy family and adopted the surname; his descendents became the Earls of Northumberland, the most powerful in northern England.

The Percy family, whose primary seat was at Alnwick Castle near Scotland, intended for Petworth to be for occasional use. However, in the late 16th century, Queen Elizabeth I grew suspicious of the Percy's allegiance to Mary, Queen of Scots, and confined them to Petworth.

In 1670, Josceline Percy, 11th Earl of Northumberland died without a male heir, leaving his considerable fortune and estates of Petworth House, Alnwick Castle, Syon House and Northumberland House to his 2-year-old daughter, Elizabeth. In 1682, already twice widowed at age 16, Elizabeth Percy married Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset. The pair became one of the wealthiest couples in England.

The current site was previously occupied by a fortified manor house founded by Henry de Percy, the 13th-century chapel and undercroft of which still survive. For the past 250 years the house and the estate have been in the hands of the prominent Wyndham family.

The house and deer park were handed over to the nation in 1947 and are now managed by the National Trust under the name Petworth House & Park.

The Leconfield Estates continue to own much of Petworth and the surrounding area. The contents of the house, in particular the paintings and sculptures, are now the property of the National Trust having been taken in lieu of accumulated death duties.

Lord Egremont and his family live in the south wing, allowing much of the remainder to be open to the public. Lady Egremont has restored the gardens.

Today's building houses an important collection of paintings and sculptures, including 19 oil paintings by J. M. W. Turner (some owned by the family, some by Tate Britain), who was a regular visitor to Petworth, paintings by Van Dyck, carvings by Grinling Gibbons and Ben Harms, classical and neoclassical sculptures (including ones by John Flaxman and John Edward Carew), and wall and ceiling paintings by Louis Laguerre. There is also a terrestrial globe by Emery Molyneux, believed to be the only one in the world in its original 1592 state

comments (12)

Nice hats.....
Chris: Damn hot Frank, low 20s..
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 28 Jun 2015, 04:50
Lord Egremont looks a lot like an SC buddy of mine...
Chris: I am trying to uphold all I hold most dear in this sovereign nation of ours Ole Sport..
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 28 Jun 2015, 06:56
Oh, fine that you show us Lord Christopher W. Egremont and Lady K. Egremont in their resting behaviour! Many,many years ago I visited this "important collection of paintngs and sculptures" ...
Chris: We found the interior of the place to be overwhelming and completely lacking in energy Philine, but the grounds, the servants' quarters and the ice creams were good..
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 28 Jun 2015, 07:39
Yes, you are right - I wished we could liberate the wonderful paintings from this traditional, dusty, museal atmosphere!
Chris: There was no lightness, no airiness about this place Philine
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 28 Jun 2015, 07:42
Are these fine people descendants of the Percy family? The gentleman looks very aristocratic and can just imagine him on the nearby polo fields having a chukka or two.

I take exception to the description of Alnwick Castle bing near Scotland, though. That;s is like saying "Brighton, near France". Alnwick is in Northumberland, ENGLAND, and the castle of Warkworth, near Alnwick, was my first discovery of the Percy family.
Chris: Quite so. I may have copied & pasted this but I didn't compose it..
It was the perfect day for a visit to Sussex. I can't remember if we have been to Petworth or not
Chris: Interesting as a one off visit
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 28 Jun 2015, 09:21
There is some similarity to the painting by Turner: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/turner-petworth-housefigures-in-the-white-library-possibly-lord-egremont-d22749
The park was landscaped by Capibility Brown - it was a garden tour I joined when I was in Petworth House and Gardens.
Chris: The landscaping was one of Capability Brown's greatest triumphs
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 28 Jun 2015, 11:01
Who's hat have you nicked
Chris: I bought it with my own money for many pennies
You are both looking very summery. Love the hats
Chris: It's called making the best of it..
You do both really look the part here Chris. We went to Claydon House near Buckingham on Tuesday and that wasn't the most inspiring of houses.
Chris: These things are all a matter of pot luck aren't they
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 28 Jun 2015, 18:29
I must admit it is not often one sees you SITTING DOWN, Chris
Chris: Even a young person as myself has to do this thing occasionally Lisl
Elizabeth and Charles are looking well - considering their age!
Chris: They are now in their dotage Tom

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera DSC-RX100
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/800s
aperture f/7.1
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 10.4mm
AVON VALLEYAVON VALLEY
YESTERDAYYESTERDAY
SHEEP SATURDAYSHEEP SATURDAY

Warning