Tiff

30 Sep 2014 162 views
 
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photoblog image NOTHING

NOTHING

The exact centre of York station, on the present-day platform 5, was the zero point for ten lines, which meant the zero post bore ten identifying plates. These were:

LO. LP. - Longlands Loop (down), from Longlands Junction, Northallerton, on the York and Newcastle, to the Leeds Northern line. Opened in 1901.

M.W. & B. - Market Weighton and Beverley, from Market Weighton, at the end of the York and Market Weighton line to the Hull and Scarborough line at Beverley. Opened in 1865, closed in 1965.

MIC. BR. - Micklefield Branch, from Church Fenton, on the York and North Midland line to the Leeds and Selby line at Micklefield. Opened in 1869.

R. CV. - Raskelf Curve, from Pilmoor, on the York and Newcastle line, to the Thirsk and Malton line. Opened in 1871, closed in 1959.

S. BR. - Sherburn Branch, from Sherburn Junction on the York and North Midland line, to the Leeds and Selby line. Opened in 1839.

Y. & H. - York and Harrogate, from Poppleton Junction on the York and Newcastle line, to Harrogate. Opened in 1848.

Y. & M.W. - York and Market Weighton, from Bootham Junction, on the York and Scarborough line, to Market Weighton. Opened in 1847, closed in 1965.

Y. & N. - York and Newcastle, from York to Newcastle. Opened in 1841, 1844, 1868, 1871.

Y. & N.M. - York and North Midland, from York to Normanton. Opened in 1839, 1840.

Y. & S. - York and Scarborough, from Waterworks Junction, York, to Scarborough. Opened in 1845.

Although most of these were short connecting lines, the list demonstrates the importance of the NER.

It was formed in July, 1854, when it controlled several important main lines. By taking over other companies it created a near monopoly in the region.

You didn't want to know this - but now you know..

NOTHING

The exact centre of York station, on the present-day platform 5, was the zero point for ten lines, which meant the zero post bore ten identifying plates. These were:

LO. LP. - Longlands Loop (down), from Longlands Junction, Northallerton, on the York and Newcastle, to the Leeds Northern line. Opened in 1901.

M.W. & B. - Market Weighton and Beverley, from Market Weighton, at the end of the York and Market Weighton line to the Hull and Scarborough line at Beverley. Opened in 1865, closed in 1965.

MIC. BR. - Micklefield Branch, from Church Fenton, on the York and North Midland line to the Leeds and Selby line at Micklefield. Opened in 1869.

R. CV. - Raskelf Curve, from Pilmoor, on the York and Newcastle line, to the Thirsk and Malton line. Opened in 1871, closed in 1959.

S. BR. - Sherburn Branch, from Sherburn Junction on the York and North Midland line, to the Leeds and Selby line. Opened in 1839.

Y. & H. - York and Harrogate, from Poppleton Junction on the York and Newcastle line, to Harrogate. Opened in 1848.

Y. & M.W. - York and Market Weighton, from Bootham Junction, on the York and Scarborough line, to Market Weighton. Opened in 1847, closed in 1965.

Y. & N. - York and Newcastle, from York to Newcastle. Opened in 1841, 1844, 1868, 1871.

Y. & N.M. - York and North Midland, from York to Normanton. Opened in 1839, 1840.

Y. & S. - York and Scarborough, from Waterworks Junction, York, to Scarborough. Opened in 1845.

Although most of these were short connecting lines, the list demonstrates the importance of the NER.

It was formed in July, 1854, when it controlled several important main lines. By taking over other companies it created a near monopoly in the region.

You didn't want to know this - but now you know..

comments (17)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 30 Sep 2014, 00:46
I am delighted that you cleared up this mystery for me, Chris...it would not be good to die without knowing this...
Chris: I have been tossing & turning in bed for years thinking about this Ray

Or maybe it was something else I was thinking about..
  • Alan
  • Ouray, Colorado.
  • 30 Sep 2014, 02:06
Ah, fascinating stuff. I assumed it was an attempt by the "We love Yorkshire" alliance to reposition what is currently known as the Greenwich Meridian. Well seen anyway; what are you doing doing oop t'North? Was there trouble at t'mill you were trying to resolve or are you offering advice about the best way to rebuilt Hadrian's Wall had the Scots decided to take home their ball?

Most American roads seem to be have a marker every mile but I'm never sure when they start counting from, maybe the state border?
Chris: A marker every mile - HOW WASTEFUL! I took this picture whilst Chad & I were changing trains at York. We were going to Scotland to tell the natives to get a grip and stay part of the UK
i found this very interesting Chris... and i like your photo showing the modern platform and train on the right...
it took you a bit of time to enlighten us with the history behind the signs... thanks....petersmile
Chris: I had to research this Peter. When I first saw it I couldn't fathom it out at all..
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 30 Sep 2014, 04:56
York and Newcastle, from York to Newcastle. Opened in 1841, 1844, 1868, 1871. I wonder couldn't they make up their mind, now I want to know when did it open.
Question: suppose I go to Longlands Junction, Norhallerton, will it give a marker how many miles to the ZERO point??
In the Netherlands we have markers (on the road) because then it is easy to send helpers in case of accidents. In America is indeed shows the distance from that point to the State border.
I think my brains did enough for today, it is now 5.54AM almost time to go to work, 'easy peasy' today, tomorrow we fly London-Atlanta smile
Have a great day today.
I think your post is very educational, now we know and don't have to wonder what the ZERO means.
Chris: Yes Astrid - ZERO means nothing

Have a good flight to the U S of A, it seems like half of Shutterchance will be there this week!
Well isn't that just cool!
Chris: The unexpected Elizabeth
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 30 Sep 2014, 07:13
I think giving a meandering pensioner, with too much time on his hands and who likes to take obscure railway memorabilia photographs, a new name ... 'Raskelf Curve' would suit him admirably.
Chris: No meandering here Comrade!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 30 Sep 2014, 07:58
I can guess why you were there, Chris
Chris: Changing trains en route for Scotland Lisl
  • gutteridge
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 30 Sep 2014, 08:30
Long ago when the Arabs were the kids as far as maths were concerned, they did not have a number of zero, they could not understand the concept.
Chris: Interesting - but it is worth noting that Zero has been proposed as the atomic number of the theoretical element tetraneutron. It has been shown that a cluster of four neutrons may be stable enough to be considered an atom in its own right. It seems would create an element with no protons and no charge on its nucleus.

As early as 1926, Professor Andreas von Trimoid coined the term neutronium for a conjectured form of matter made up of neutrons with no protons, which he placed as the chemical element of atomic number zero at the head of his new version of the periodic table. It was subsequently placed as a noble gas in the middle of several spiral representations of the periodic system for classifying the chemical elements.
  • gutteridge
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 30 Sep 2014, 08:31
Thank you for all of this fantastic information Tiff.
Chris: You mean - imaginative or fanciful; remote from reality.
"fantastic Droitwychian creatures"


synonyms include fanciful, extravagant, extraordinary, irrational, wild, mad, absurd, far-fetched, nonsensical, incredible, unbelievable, unthinkable, implausible, improbable, unlikely, doubtful, dubious;
very very educative Chris!
Chris: A pleasure Ronky
I can rest happy now with this knowledge, Chris.
Chris: I had to tell someone..
  • Penny
  • still here
  • 30 Sep 2014, 12:26
Have you been up this way, Chris....? If you made it to York you were very near Paul.
Chris: On our way to Scotland a couple of weeks ago Penny, we stayed in Stirling
That explains that then. Rather mystifying if you're not in the know
Chris: Another of life's mysteries explained Janet
I've been to York several times but never come across this at the station.
Chris: I remember it as being in the middle of the station
This is actually very interesting. I had no idea it existed and would not have realised what is was
Chris: I certainly didn't know of its existence before falling over it at York station but I could work out its purpose without too much trouble
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 30 Sep 2014, 19:00
This is wonderful Chris
Chris: I know it was a practical thing once but in 2014 it is a completely mad thing Anne..
  • Robbyne
  • United States
  • 2 Oct 2014, 14:50
Interesting...

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