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10 Mar 2018 99 views
 
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photoblog image THE MENDIP MINERIES

THE MENDIP MINERIES

 

 

 

There has been a long history of mining on the Mendip Hills stretching back over 2000 years to Iron Age times.

Many minerals have been won from the region, but the most common were the ores of lead, zinc and iron. It has been estimated that about 100 000 tons of lead have been obtained from the Mendips. Small amounts of manganese, silver (associated with lead ore), barium and strontium have also been worked. In East Mendip, there are relatively few mineral deposits, but here coal mining was once an important industry.

There must be literally thousands of mines scattered across the Mendip Hills, most of which remain unexplored. Most of the known mines are small, up to 40 m deep and generally less than 100 m long, but a few of the larger mines have several hundred metres of passage. Not all the mines produced ore, many were exploratory shafts sunk along calcite veins in the hope of fining richer ore bodies.

Most of the lead ore came from the central Mendip region between Charterhouse and Green Ore, whereas most of the zinc was obtained from the region around Shipham and Rowberrow. Smaller ore fields occurred as far afield as Banwell and Shepton Mallet.

THE MENDIP MINERIES

 

 

 

There has been a long history of mining on the Mendip Hills stretching back over 2000 years to Iron Age times.

Many minerals have been won from the region, but the most common were the ores of lead, zinc and iron. It has been estimated that about 100 000 tons of lead have been obtained from the Mendips. Small amounts of manganese, silver (associated with lead ore), barium and strontium have also been worked. In East Mendip, there are relatively few mineral deposits, but here coal mining was once an important industry.

There must be literally thousands of mines scattered across the Mendip Hills, most of which remain unexplored. Most of the known mines are small, up to 40 m deep and generally less than 100 m long, but a few of the larger mines have several hundred metres of passage. Not all the mines produced ore, many were exploratory shafts sunk along calcite veins in the hope of fining richer ore bodies.

Most of the lead ore came from the central Mendip region between Charterhouse and Green Ore, whereas most of the zinc was obtained from the region around Shipham and Rowberrow. Smaller ore fields occurred as far afield as Banwell and Shepton Mallet.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 10 Mar 2018, 00:24
How interesting is that!

More please, Teacher.
Chris: All in good time..
This is a lovely place. It belies it's history of being raped.
Chris: That is a good way of putting it Elizaberth
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 10 Mar 2018, 06:45
Not many dragonflies on your day there, Chris
Chris: I'm afraid not Lisl, this was a very chilly winter day..
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk : where the sun rises first in England
  • 10 Mar 2018, 07:38
It must be Englan's holey land
Chris: Yes, all right..
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 10 Mar 2018, 07:41
I expected to see some remains of the mineries - what an interesting area! What a history!
Chris: A lot of the workings here were Roman Philine, they were just holes in the ground
Well I never knew that


But now I do
Chris: And it is all true too
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 10 Mar 2018, 08:21
Fascinating stuff. I'm aware of the coral mines around the Radstock area but nothing else. I wonder what is left to be discovered?
Chris: I think you mean coal mines
I could never work out how they found all these deposits with no equipment, it must be so much easier nowadays
Chris: A good question Martin, I suppose the Romans were pretty advanced regarding virtually all technology of the times
Is this an old pit mine that has turned to a lake?
Chris: I expect so Mary
Makes a good landscape. Me, I live near the Triassic Basin. smile
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chatham_County,_North_Carolina
Chris: Very interesting Larry: thank you
A really interesting post Chris, the picture is a good starter but having spent most of my working life in the offices of one of the countries leading aggregates companies (ARC/Hanson) I find anything to do with quarrying of interest, I certainly didn't know about any of this.
Chris: Hanson are a big player near Bath Brian, they have extensive quarrying interests in Somerset
very interesting post and text, Chris. i had the opportunity to visit a spot in the province of Nord Rhein Westfalen in Germany which was something similar in terms of coal mining. Since then, there were secondary forests planted and now since there is no further industrial activity, it has become an untouched bit secondary forest land.
Chris: Very interesting, thank you Ayush
Seeing the tranquil landscape and the body of water, it is hard to imagine there was a mine in its place
Chris: And mining lead, of all things, too Claudio
Fascinating stuff, Chris - and a lovely landscape!
Chris: Thank you Tom

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